The

National Skills Database

If unemployment has one specific paradox, it’s this: employers often can’t find qualified employees at the very same time qualified employees are looking for employers.

If unemployment has one specific paradox, it’s this: employers often can’t find qualified employees at the very same time qualified employees are looking for employers. That’s because our methods for connecting qualified prospective employees to jobs are also a patchwork of systems, programs, and, well, Craigslist.

About the National Skills Database

Many Web sites help people find jobs, but one thing they don’t do is help match skills with needs. If you’re a prospective employer, you can go to Monster and can sift through a ton of resumes — if you’re willing to pay at least $650 for two weeks. And if you want to be able to look at resumes all year, across the country, it’s going to cost you a cool ten grand (ok, really $9,995) for the privilege.

What we need is a National Skills Database. This is an online resource that connects prospective employees with prospective employers, across a wide variety of skills. Rather than being indexed by job title or full resume, it’d be indexed by the set of skills needed.

This is where the National Skills Database comes in. Any American who wanted to could sign up for the service (for free, of course). You could list not only employment history, but all the individual skills you have. You could also add skills not already in the system. People have diverse skills and while their resume might imply one thing, their complete collection of skills provides a much better picture of who they are.

By registering their information with the National Skills Database, each of them would be available to be discovered by prospective employers. Each person in the database could flag himself or herself as available, not-available, or willing to consider new opportunities. Employers could search by a wide range of interconnected skills, titles, regions, and more.

The National Skills Database would combine the resume and recommendation features of LinkedIn, the virtually free job listings of Craigslist, the trust rating system of eBay, and the powerful search capabilities of Google.

Get Involved

Are you interested in helping build the National Skills Database? We need a lot of help. First, we’re looking for technical people who can actually help architect the system. If you’re a PHP or MySQL programmer, we’d like to hear from you. We’re looking for corporate partners who can provide the scaling and hosting resources. And we’re looking for volunteers to help get the word out.

If you’re interested in getting involved click here and Make a Difference.

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